Usak Wind Power Project

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Wind power is fast becoming one of the most cost-competitive and resilient energy sources. Through technology innovations and economies of scale, the global wind power market has nearly quadrupled in size over the past decade.

Today, there is 743 GW of wind power capacity globally, which has prevented over 1.1 billion tonnes of CO2 emissions from entering the atmosphere – that’s equal to the annual carbon emissions of South America!

In 2020, 93 GW of new wind energy capacity was installed globally – a 53 percent year-on-year increase, and the largest single-year growth on record.

But according to the Global Wind Energy Council, global wind power growth must triple over the next decade to achieve net zero emissions by 2050. To have a chance of keeping global warming below 2 degrees Celsius, wind power must reach a minimum of 180 GW in every year to 2030, scaling up to around 280 GW a year beyond 2030.

Today, there is 743 GW of wind power capacity globally, which has prevented over 1.1 billion tonnes of CO2 emissions from entering the atmosphere – that’s equal to the annual carbon emissions of South America!
743 GW of Wind Power Capacity Globally
Net Zero by 2050

Wind power is the clean energy technology with the most decarbonisation potential per MW. In particular, wind power is a cleaner and more efficient energy than solar power. One study has found that it takes approximately 48,704 solar panels to generate the same amount of electricity per kWh as one wind turbine.

That’s why investing in wind power projects is central to Mawson’s carbon offset program.

One such investment is the Usak Wind Power Project, a large-scale wind farm in Usak Province, Turkey. The project has 36 wind turbines capable of generating 54 MW. The energy is stored in a substation and fed into the Turkish National Grid.

In a country that is electricity deficient and over-reliant on oil and gas imports, the Usak Wind Power Project will have a substantial impact on the reliability of electricity in the region and on the country’s move to green energy. Since its commencement in 2015, the project has generated 645,989 MWh of net electricity, avoiding 374,572 tonnes of CO2 emissions.

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